Transfers from Edinburgh to St Andrews – phone 07576-127097

Bookings available for transfers from Edinburgh Airport to St Andrews
Transfers from Edinburgh to St Andrews can be booked on 07576-127097 or contact us online . Airport taxis offers a professional transfer service from  Edinburgh to St Andrews  . Our fares are 25% below standard local Edinburgh tariffs. Call us now on freephone 0800-6190575 for a fixed price quote or to make a booking. International customers can contact us online to make an enquiry or a booking .

Airport Taxis

The company transfers customers throughout Scotland with a reliable 24 hour service. Business customers can prepay by credit card. For more information and bookings phone 07576-127097 24 hours.
Taxi fares can be prepaid by credit card.

Edinburgh Airport taxis

Professional transfer service to all the major cities of Scotland. Low cost transfers. Call us now on freephone 0800-6190575 for a fixed price quote or to make a booking. We accept bookings from international customers  contact us online .
Book a taxi from Falkirk to Edinburgh Airport

 

Edinburgh Zoo celebrates first anniversary of pandas arrival

One year ago Tian Tian and Yang Guang arrived at Edinburgh Zoo amid worldwide interest after a 5,000- mile flight from China into Edinburgh Airport.
Since then, more than half a million visitors have been to see the animals, who are set to stay in Scotland for another nine years.The arrival of the pandas has been a massive commercial success for the Zoo.
Iain Valentine, Director of Research and Conservation at the zoo, said much has been learnt about the species over the last 12 months.
“Looking back on this, our first giant panda year, it has been a great success,” he said.
The only disappointing thing about the pandas has been their failure to mate. Pandas have a limited breeding season and did not manage to mate this year, although Mr Valentine says he has high hopes for 2013.

Fuel supplies to Edinburgh Airport limited as refinery has production problems

Scotland’s busiest airports were forced to limit vital fuel supplies to airlines to avoid disruption to flights, it has emerged.
Operators at the country’s two busiest hubs – Edinburgh and Glasgow – stopped receiving deliveries from the Grangemouth Petroineos refinery
Concern was raised over the quality of the jet fuel supplied by the Grangemouth plant.

Fearing it could lead to supply shortages Scottish airport bosses were forced to ration stocks to try to avoid flight cancellations and disruption. A spokesman at Edinburgh Airport confirmed that it had experienced problems in fuel supplies since Tuesday.

He said: “There has been a shortage of aircraft fuel across Scottish airports caused by quality issues at Petroineos’ Grangemouth refinery.

“This has meant we have had to ration our supplies.”

Glasgow Airport said it had maintained its flight schedule by using stocks held on site.

Ineos – which operates the refinery – stressed no flights had been disrupted as a result of the problem.

Initially it was feared that crucial fuel supplies to Scotland’s garage forecourts could also be affected although none have been reported.

But the AA put its breakdown teams on alert while Central Scotland police force did likewise with its traffic division.

In a statement Ineos said: “Petroineos has been supplying jet fuel this week to all airports in Scotland. The company has been working with customers to help them prioritise deliveries as suppliers bring their infrastructure and levels of resilience back to normal.

“To our knowledge no passengers have been affected since deliveries commenced on Monday morning.”

But the problem has sparked concern that there could be a shortage of fuel supplies this winter.

Refinery maintenance and closures in Europe and the US are limiting the availability of oil products, making retailers vulnerable to supply shocks.

Cameron prepares way for third runway at Heathrow Airport

Prime Minister David Cameron has completed his cabinet reshuffle and he has replaced Justine Greening as Transport Minister .

Greening is MP for Roehampton & Southfields, directly under the airport’s flight path , and her mission was to stop the development of a  third runway at Heathrow Airport .In the end she was only  able to prevent the government giving the green light in this parliament.

The question is now not when but how the Conservatives do a massive a u-turn on the third runway. It looks as if they want another enquiry to delay the decision until after the next election.

Patrick McLoughlin, who will take over as transport secretary, has declared he has an “open mind” on the expansion of Britain’s only hub airport, joining chancellor George Osborne in a cabinet which increasingly favours a third runway, with the business case trumping environmental concerns.

While the party will suffer in seats close to the airport, they have calculated the economic recovery must take precedence.

The business community has been baying for additional capacity to connect to growing markets in Asia and South America for years, and it now seems certain the Conservatives will include support for a third runway in their manifesto for the 2015 election.

Operating Heathrow as a ‘mixed-mode’ airport would increase capacity by as much as a quarter, but would again breach noise restrictions as planes approach from different directions.

Short-haul flights could also be barred from precious Heathrow landing slots, allowing only long-haul traffic to use limited resources. This might work in the short-term but is no solution.

Gatwick could be expanded, or even Stansted, with second runways at either. But, in reality, the UK can maintain only one hub airport.

‘Heathwick’ – a high-speed rail link between Gatwick and Heathrow – was swiftly rejected last year after being put forward by civil servants.

This would leave only  Boris’s fantasy island in the Thames.

Not only is the planned location in one of the most congested flight paths in Europe, on the approach to Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, that path covers five separate Special Protection Areas packed with wildlife.

Environmentalists could delay the project for years, while birds would also be hazardous to planes.

Funding for the £40 billion project is also far from assured, with some even suggesting a levy on planes landing at Heathrow could be imposed: a hard sell to British Airways, which would effectively be asked to pay for the demolition of its established base.

As for the transport connections? After the years it took to have Crossrail approved, it is hard to imagine Boris Island and its required infrastructure being approved by 2050, if ever.

Outspoken as always, Johnson rose to the challenge earlier, with a statement from the mayor exclaiming: “The third runway would mean more traffic, more noise, more pollution – and a serious reduction in the quality of life for hundreds of thousands of people.

“We will fight this all the way. Even if a third runway was built, it would not do the job of meeting Britain’s needs.

“If we are to remain Europe’s premier business hub we need a new four-runway airport, preferably to the east of London, that addresses the problem of aviation capacity before it is too late, and business is driven into the arms of our European competitors.”

From the point of view of airports in Scotland like Edinburgh and Glasgow, any development which brings more passengers into Britain would be a good thing as  a proportion of those flyers will terminate their journey in Scotland

Edinburgh Airport named best airport in Europe

Edinburgh Airport is not just Scotland’s busiest airport – it is also officially the best airport in Europe.

Edinburgh Airport was named “Best European airport: 5m – 10m passengers” at the eighth Annual Airports Council International awards in Madrid. The airport, which changed hands this month in a £807.2 million deal, was given the award for its focus on its customer base and the responses to the feedback that they provide.

Edinburgh held off competition from Cologne, Birmingham, Luton, Nice, Marseille and Milan to hold on to the title.

Chief executive Jim O’Sullivan, said: “This is an outstanding achievement. To win the prestigious award for the second consecutive year is impressive enough, but to do so whilst having the challenge of being sold is truly amazing.

“The team at Edinburgh airport is dedicated, focused and deserving of this accolade. We will keep working hard to deliver what our passengers want – great service and a diverse range of routes. That’s what’s at the core of this and last year’s success.”

Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP) took ownership of the capital airport on June 1 after buying it from BAA in an arrangement announced in April. The airport is also busy because of the construction work taking place there at the moment. Edinburgh’s new tramline terminates at the airport and visitors to the airport will notice the end of the line being installed just a few yards from the terminal building.

BAA was forced to sell it after the Competition Commission ruled that it must sell either Glasgow or Edinburgh airport.

GIP is an independent infrastructure fund manager. It took over London City in 2006 and then bought Gatwick from BAA for £1.51 billion in 2009.