Edinburgh Airport is to be sold by BAA

Edinburgh Airport is to be sold by operator BAA after it was told by competition regulators to sell either Glasgow or Edinburgh Airport . Edinburgh is now the busiest airport in Scotland. BAA has tried delaying tactics for 2 years.
BAA is now beginning preparations for a sale and it will probably approach the market in the New Year in order to agree a sale by Summer 2012. BAA chief executive, Colin Matthews, said they would be “very sorry to see it leave BAA”. The airport ┬áhad annoyed customers by starting to charge for dropping off and picking up. MSPs have also become aware of the issue with the possibility of a legal challenge to the charges.

BAA will hold on to Aberdeen Airport and Glasgow Airport.
It has also been told to sell London Stansted Airport.

Mr Matthews said: “Edinburgh is a great airport with a great team and a great future and we will be very sorry to see it leave BAA. We remain committed to Scotland and we will continue our long-term investment to improve passenger and airline experience at Aberdeen and Glasgow, as well as at Edinburgh until the sale is complete.Choosing which airport to sell has been a difficult decision.

Edinburgh Airport has shown itself to be a strong and resilient asset throughout the economic downturn.
“Passenger numbers at Edinburgh have grown by more than 6% over the past year and in an uncertain market we expect it to be an attractive asset to prospective buyers.

“Glasgow Airport has great opportunities for future growth and development and we think BAA is well-placed to build on its recent success. Both airports are of national importance and have a bright future.”

First Edinburgh tram arrives late

The first tram to be delivered for Edinburgh has arrived in a way that symbolises the whole project – late. The trams were supposed to improve the Edinburgh travel system but have proved to be an almost complete let-down from start to finish for Edinburgh residents.

The vehicle was due to arrive in the capital after a 900-mile journey from northern Spain at 11am. But it was two hours late.

The delay for the seven parts of the tram was put down to bad weather causing the ferry to be late.

It is the first of a 27-strong fleet that is expected to be running along the streets of the capital by 2014.

Housed at the depot at Gogar, the rest of the fleet are expected to arrive over the coming months.

The City of Edinburgh Council said the depot is now electrified which means static testing can be carried out as soon as the vehicles arrive. Once the test track is finished in early December they will start “dynamic testing”.

The project has been delayed after a series of disputes between the council and contractors. Last week an Edinburgh councillor admitted that he did not have the knowledge or experience to manage the contarct for the council.